free ebooks
Address to the Non-Slaveholders of the South

ADDRESS TO THE NON-SLAVEHOLDERS OF THE SOUTH, ON THE SOCIAL AND POLITICAL EVILS OF SLAVERY.

New York: PUBLISHED BY THE AM. & FOR. ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETY, WILLIAM HARNED, AGENT, 61 JOHN STREET.

For Sale at the Depository of the Amer. and For. A. S. Society, NO. 61 JOHN STREET, NEW YORK, at $35 per thousand, $4 per hundred, 50 cents per dozen, and 5 cents for a single copy. WILLIAM HARNED, Publishing Agent.

ADDRESS TO THE NON-SLAVEHOLDERS OF THE SLAVE STATES.

FELLOW-CITIZENS:

We ask your attention to the injuries inflicted upon you and your children, by an institution which lives by your sufferance, and will die at your mandate. Slavery is maintained by _you_ whom it impoverishes and degrades, not by those upon whom it confers wealth and influence. These assertions will be received by you and others with surprise and incredulity. Before you condemn them, ponder the following considerations and statistics.

We all know that the sugar and cotton cultivation of the South is conducted, not like the agriculture of the North, on small farms and with few hands, but on vast plantations and with large gangs of negroes, technically called "the force." In the breeding States, men, women and children form the great staple for exportation; and like other stock, require capital on the part of those who follow the business of rearing them. It is also a matter of notoriety, that the price of slaves has been and still is such as to confine their possession almost exclusively to the rich. We might as well talk of poor men owning herds of cattle and studs of horses, as gangs of negroes. When an infant will bring one hundred, and a man from four hundred to a thousand dollars in the market, slaves are not commodities to be found in the cabins of the poor. You are moreover aware that the great capitalists of the South have their wealth chiefly invested in plantations and slaves, and not as with us in commerce and manufactures.

It has been repeatedly stated that Mr. Carroll, of Baltimore, the former president of the Colonization Society, was the owner of 1,000 slaves. The newspapers, in announcing the death of Mr. Pollock, of North Carolina, remarked that he had left 1,500 slaves. In the account of Mr. Madison's funeral, it was mentioned that he was followed to the grave by 100 of his slaves, and it is probable that the women and children were not included. The following article, from the _Gospel Messenger_ for August, 1842, gives us some idea of the feudal vassalage prevailing on the estates of some of your lordly planters. "A NOBLE DEED.--Dr. Mercer, of Adams county, Mississippi, has lately erected, at his own expense, and for the advantage of his _vast_ plantation, and the people on his lands, a neat church and parsonage house, at the cost of over $30,000. He pays the salary of the minister, $1,200 a year, besides his meat and bread. On Bishop Otey's late visit to that congregation, he and Mr. Deacon, the incumbent, baptized in one day _one hundred and eight_ children and _ten_ adults, all belonging to the plantation."


eBook Search
Social Sharing
Share Button
About us

freefictionbooks.org is a collection of free ebooks that can be read online. Ebooks are split into pages for easier reading and better bookmarking.

We have more than 35,000 free books in our collection and are adding new books daily.

We invite you to link to us, so as many people as possible can enjoy this wonderful free website.

© 2010-2013 freefictionbooks.org - All Rights Reserved.

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Contact Us