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Across India by Oliver Optic

Including an epitome of those great events in India


The

commander, the professor, the surgeon, the young millionaire, and others who have hitherto given the "talks" and lectures for the instruction of the young people, and incidentally of the older ones also, find themselves almost entirely relieved from duty in this direction by those whom the ship's company have saved from inevitable death in the stormy billows of the Arabian Sea. The gratitude of the two titled members of the trio, and their earnest appreciation of the educational object of the long voyage, induce them to make themselves very useful on board.

They do not confine themselves to the duty presented to them in "Conference Hall;" but they are profuse, and even extravagant, in their hospitality, becoming the hosts of the entire party, and treating them like princes in the principal cities of India, in all of which they are quite at home. One of the Hindu maharajahs proves to be an old friend of both of them, and the party reside a week at his court; and the time is given up to the study of manners and customs, as well as to hunting and the sports of the country.

Felix McGavonty, with Kilkenny blood in his veins, is firm in his belief that he ought not to be afraid of snakes, and does for India a little of what St. Patrick did completely for Ireland. The other "live boys," though not so much inclined as the Milesian to battle with the cobra-de-capello, have some experience in shooting tigers, leopards,

deer, pythons, crocodiles, and other game, though not enough to wholly satisfy their natural enterprise.

The tour of the party is made by railroad in India, from Bombay, taking in Lahore, Delhi, Agra, Cawnpoor, Lucknow, Benares, Calcutta, and by the Guardian-Mother to Madras and Ceylon. On the way and in the cities the titled conductors continue their "talks" and lectures about the places visited, with as much of history as time would permit, including an epitome of those great events in India, the Mutiny of the Sepoys, the "Black Hole," and other events of the past. The speakers were assisted by elaborate maps, which the reader can find in his atlas. Statistics are given to some extent for purposes of comparison. Brief notices of the lives of such men as Bishop Heber, Sir Colin Campbell, Henry Havelock, and others are introduced.

The party did not claim to have seen all there was of India; simply to have obtained "specimen bricks" of the principal cities, with a fair idea of the manners and customs of the people.

WILLIAM. T. ADAMS.

* * * * *

CONTENTS

PAGE

CHAPTER I.

ABOUT FINDING THE LONGITUDE. 1

CHAPTER II.

THE WRECK IN THE ARABIAN SEA. 10

CHAPTER III.

A REVIEW OF THE PAST FOURTEEN MONTHS. 19

CHAPTER IV.

FIRST AND SECOND CUTTERS TO THE RESCUE. 30

CHAPTER V.

THE TITLED GENTLEMEN OF THE TRAVANCORE 40

CHAPTER VI.

THE GENERAL INTRODUCTION IN THE CABIN. 50

CHAPTER VII.

DR. FERROLAN'S EXPLANATION OF THE WRECK 60

CHAPTER VIII.


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