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The College, the Market, and the Court by Dall

THE COLLEGE, THE MARKET,

AND

THE COURT;

OR,

WOMAN'S RELATION TO EDUCATION, LABOR, AND LAW.

BY CAROLINE H. DALL,

AUTHOR OF "HISTORICAL SKETCHES," "SUNSHINE," "THE LIFE OF DR. ZAKRZEWSKA," ETC.

"Let this be copied out, And keep it safe for our remembrance. Return the precedent to these lords again."--KING JOHN.

"How canst thou make me thy friend who in nothing am like thee? Thy life and dwelling are under the waters; but my way of living Is to eat all that man does!"--BATRACHOMYOMACHIA.

BOSTON: LEE AND SHEPARD. 1867.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1867, by

LEE AND SHEPARD,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.

CAMBRIDGE:

STEREOTYPED AND PRINTED BY JOHN WILSON AND SON.

TO LUCRETIA MOTT,

FOR MORE THAN FIFTY YEARS A PREACHER AND REFORMER; SPOTLESS ALIKE IN ALL PUBLIC AND PRIVATE RELATIONS; WHOSE CHILDREN'S GRANDCHILDREN RISE UP TO CALL HER BLESSED;

This Book is Dedicated,

SINCE SHE IS THE BEST EXAMPLE THAT I KNOW OF WHAT ALL WOMEN MAY AND SHOULD BECOME.

"A woman Leading with sober pace an armed man, All bossed in gold, and thus the superscription: 'I, Justice, bring this injured exile back To claim his portion in his father's hall.'"

SEVEN AGAINST THEBES.

A PREFACE

TO BE READ AFTER THE BOOK.

When, some years ago, I delivered nine lectures upon the Condition of Woman, I had no intention of printing them until time had matured my judgments and justified my conclusions. Peculiar circumstances afterwards induced me to modify this decision. The first course of lectures, now printed as "The College," had proved unexpectedly popular, and was many times repeated. At its close, I announced the second course upon Labor, involving the subject of Prostitution as the result of Low Wages; and a very unexpected opposition ensued. My files can still show the large number of letters I received, beseeching me not to touch this subject; and private intercession followed, on the part of those I hold wisest and most dear, to the same effect. Why I did not yield to all the clamor, I cannot tell,--except that I was not working for myself nor _of_ myself.

I thought it, however, necessary to take unusual precautions to prevent these lectures from being misunderstood. I wrote private notes, enclosing tickets, to almost all the leading clergymen, asking that they would attend them as a personal favor to myself. I believe I did not allude to the efforts which had been made to silence me, except when I wrote to those who had joined in the outcry. In that case, I demanded the attendance as an act of justice. These notes were kindly responded to; and grateful tears started to my eyes, when I found on the seats before me white-haired men, who set aside their prejudices for my sake. Whatever might have been thought before, the delivery of the lectures silenced all objections. They were fully attended and frequently repeated; and I followed the delivery by the printing of this particular course, in order that misunderstandings should not have time to establish themselves. The book was well received, both at home and abroad. Letters came to me from the far shores of India and Africa, thanking me for its publication. The first edition was sold at once; and I should have reprinted the book, but that I did not wish to re-issue these lectures in an isolated form. I wanted them reprinted, if at all, in their proper place, subordinated to my main thought.


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