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A Guide to the Virginia Springs by Moorman

A GUIDE TO THE VIRGINIA SPRINGS:

GIVING, IN ADDITION TO

The Routes and Distances,

A DESCRIPTION OF THE SPRINGS,

AND ALSO OF THE NATURAL CURIOSITIES OF THE STATE.

STAUNTON, VA.: ROBERT COWAN.

PHILADELPHIA: THOMAS, COWPERTHWAIT & CO. 1851.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1851, BY ROBERT COWAN, In the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Western District of Virginia.

C. SHERMAN, PRINTER.

PREFACE.

So frequent has been the demand for some Guide to the Virginia Springs, of portable dimensions, and nothing of the kind having as yet appeared, we have been induced to _compile_ the following little work, hoping to meet, in some measure, the wants of visiters to these Watering-Places. In giving the various routes, we have endeavoured to describe the Springs, and also the Natural Curiosities, as we proceed.

Other matter than that for which we are indebted to the proprietors of the Springs, has been gathered from various publications.

A number of books and pamphlets have been written about the Mineral Waters of Virginia, but in _no single one_, we believe, has an account been given of so many watering-places as in this.

There are many other Springs in the State whose waters, no doubt, contain valuable medicinal qualities, perhaps even exceeding several of which an account has been given in this work; but as we have not been able to get information with regard to them,--not knowing, in fact, even their localities,--we must, of course, much as we regret it, omit them.

There are, doubtless, also, many other great natural curiosities beside those of which we have given a description; but as we lay no claim to authorship,--_merely being a compiler_,--and having no information concerning them, we will have to leave them as we have done the Springs referred to in our last paragraph.

February, 1851.

GUIDE TO THE SPRINGS.

ROUTES TO THE VIRGINIA SPRINGS.

From Washington City to the Virginia Springs there are two main leading routes. One is down the Potomac River (passing in sight of Mount Vernon) to Acquia Creek, forty-five miles; thence by railroad to Fredericksburg, fourteen miles; to the Junction, thirty-seven miles; to Louisa Court-House, thirty-seven miles; to Gordonsville, thirteen miles; and to Charlottesville, twenty-one miles. One mile west of this place is the University of Virginia, one of the most flourishing institutions in the Union. The buildings are fine, and in full view from the road.

Three miles southeast of Charlottesville is Monticello, the seat of Thomas Jefferson. The railroad not having, as yet, been completed beyond Charlottesville, we proceed thence by stage via Cox, Brookesville, Rockfish Gap, Waynesboro, and Fishersville to Staunton, thirty-eight miles. In this place are the Western Insane Asylum, and the Institution for the Deaf and Dumb and Blind, two noble state institutions. Staunton is much resorted to during the summer by persons from the tide-water region of the state.


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