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History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empir

The Turkish Bertezena is called Thou men by Klaproth


2511: The Mongol Temugin is also, though erroneously, explained by Rubruquis, a smith. Schmidt, p 876.--M.]

[Footnote 2512: There appears the same confusion here. Bertezena (Berte-Scheno) is claimed as the founder of the Mongol race. The name means the gray (blauliche) wolf. In fact, the same tradition of the origin from a wolf seems common to the Mongols and the Turks. The Mongol Berte-Scheno, of the very curious Mongol History, published and translated by M. Schmidt of Petersburg, is brought from Thibet. M. Schmidt considers this tradition of the Thibetane descent of the royal race of the Mongols to be much earlier than their conversion to Lamaism, yet it seems very suspicious. See Klaproth, Tabl. de l'Asie, p. 159. The Turkish Bertezena is called Thou-men by Klaproth, p. 115. In 552, Thou-men took the title of Kha-Khan, and was called Il Khan.--M.]

[Footnote 2513: Great Bucharia is called Turkistan: see Hammer, 2. It includes all the last steppes at the foot of the Altai. The name is the same with that of the Turan of Persian poetic legend.--M.]

[Footnote 26: The country of the Turks, now of the Calmucks, is well described in the Genealogical History, p. 521--562. The curious notes of the French translator are enlarged and digested in the second volume of the English version.]

[Footnote 27: Visdelou, p. 141, 151. The fact, though it strictly

belongs to a subordinate and successive tribe, may be introduced here.]

[Footnote 28: Procopius, Persic. l. i. c. 12, l. ii. c. 3. Peyssonel, Observations sur les Peuples Barbares, p. 99, 100, defines the distance between Caffa and the old Bosphorus at xvi. long Tartar leagues.]

[Footnote 29: See, in a Memoire of M. de Boze, (Mem. de l'Academie des Inscriptions, tom. vi. p. 549--565,) the ancient kings and medals of the Cimmerian Bosphorus; and the gratitude of Athens, in the Oration of Demosthenes against Leptines, (in Reiske, Orator. Graec. tom. i. p. 466, 187.)]

[Footnote 30: For the origin and revolutions of the first Turkish empire, the Chinese details are borrowed from De Guignes (Hist. des Huns, tom. P. ii. p. 367--462) and Visdelou, (Supplement a la Bibliotheque Orient. d'Herbelot, p. 82--114.) The Greek or Roman hints are gathered in Menander (p. 108--164) and Theophylact Simocatta, (l. vii. c. 7, 8.)]

Chapter XLII: State Of The Barbaric World.--Part II.

In the rapid career of conquest, the Turks attacked and subdued the nation of the Ogors or Varchonites [3011] on the banks of the River Til, which derived the epithet of Black from its dark water or gloomy forests. [31] The khan of the Ogors was slain with three hundred thousand of his subjects, and their bodies were scattered over the space of four days' journey: their

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