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Hugh, Bishop of Lincoln by Charles L. Marson

Some of the spellings and hyphenations in the original are unusual; they have not been changed. A few obvious typographical errors have been corrected, and they and other possible errors are listed at the end of this e-text.

HUGH, BISHOP OF LINCOLN

London : Edward Arnold : 1901

HUGH BISHOP OF LINCOLN

A SHORT STORY OF ONE OF THE MAKERS OF MEDIAEVAL ENGLAND

by

CHARLES L. MARSON Curate of Hambridge Author of "The Psalms at Work," Etc.

Tua me, genitor, tua tristis imago Saepius occurens, haec limina tendere adegit. Stant sale Tyrrheno classes. Da jungere dextram Da, genitor; teque amplexu ne subtrahe nostro.

AEN. VI. 695.

London Edward Arnold 37, Bedford Street, Strand 1901

CONTENTS

CHAPTER PAGE

INTRODUCTION vii

I. THE BOY HUGH 1

II. BROTHER HUGH 12

III. PRIOR HUGH 26

IV. THE BISHOP ELECT AND CONSECRATE 42

V. THE BISHOP AT WORK 60

VI. IN TROUBLES 78

VII. AND DISPUTES 94

VIII. THE BUILDER 111

IX. UNDER KING JOHN 128

X. HOMEWARD BOUND 143

INTRODUCTION

In a short biography the reader must expect short statements, rather than detailed arguments, and in a popular tale he will not look for embattled lists of authorities. But if he can be stirred up to search further into the matter for himself, he will find a list of authorities ancient and modern come not unacceptable to begin upon.

The author has incurred so many debts of kindness in this work from many friends, and from many who were before not even acquaintances, that he must flatly declare himself bankrupt to his creditors, and rejoice if they will but grant him even a second-class certificate. Among the major creditors he must acknowledge his great obligations to the hospitable Chancellor of Lincoln and Mrs. Crowfoot, to the Rev. A. Curtois, Mr. Haig, and some others, all of whom were willing and even anxious that the story of their saint should be told abroad, even by the halting tongues of far-away messengers. The same kind readiness appeared at Witham: and indeed everybody, who knew already about St. Hugh, has seemed anxious that the knowledge of him should be spread abroad. It has snowed books, pamphlets, articles, views, maps, and guesses; and if much has remained unsaid or been said with incautious brusqueness, rather than with balanced oppressiveness, the reader who carps will always be welcome to such material as the author has by him, for elucidating the truth. If he has been misled by a blind guide, that guide must plead that he has consulted good oculists and worthy spectacle-makers, and has had every good intention of steering clear of the ditch.


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