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A History of the Gipsies by Walter Simson

I could sail the seas with my Jockie Faa


JOHNNY

FAA, THE GIPSY LADDIE.

The Gipsies came to my Lord Cassilis' yett, And oh! but they sang bonnie; They sang sae sweet, and sae complete, That down came our fair ladie.

She came tripping down the stair, And all her maids before her; As soon as they saw her weel-far'd face They coost their glamourie owre her.

She gave to them the good wheat bread, And they gave her the ginger; But she gave them a far better thing, The gold ring off her finger.

"Will ye go wi' me, my hinny and my heart, Will ye go wi' me, my dearie; And I will swear, by the staff of my spear, That thy lord shall nae mair come near thee."

"Gar take from me my silk manteel, And bring to me a plaidie; For I will travel the world owre, Along with the Gipsy laddie.

"I could sail the seas with my Jockie Faa, I could sail the seas with my dearie; I could sail the seas with my Jockie Faa, And with pleasure could drown with my dearie."

They wandered high, they wandered low, They wandered late and early, Until they came to an old tenant's barn, And by this time she was weary.

"Last night I lay in a weel-made

bed, And my noble lord beside me; And now I must lie in an old tenant's barn, And the black crew glowring owre me."

"O hold your tongue, my hinny and my heart, O hold your tongue, my dearie; For I will swear by the moon and the stars That thy lord shall nae mair come near thee."

They wandered high, they wandered low, They wandered late and early, Until they came to that wan water, And by this time she was weary.

"Aften I have rode that wan water, And my Lord Cassilis beside me; And now I must set in my white feet, and wade, And carry the Gipsy laddie."

By-and-by came home this noble lord, And asking for his ladie; The one did cry, the other did reply, "She is gone with the Gipsy laddie."

"Go, saddle me the black," he says, "The brown rides never so speedie; And I will neither eat nor drink Till I bring home my ladie."

He wandered high, he wandered low, He wandered late and early, Until he came to that wan water, And there he spied his ladie.

"O wilt thou go home, my hinny and my heart, O wilt thou go home, my dearie; And I will close thee in a close room Where no man shall come near thee."

"I will not go home, my hinny and heart, I will not come, my dearie; If I have brewn good beer, I will drink of the same, And my lord shall nae mair come near me.

"But I will swear by the moon and the stars, And the sun that shines sae clearly, That I am as free of the Gipsy gang As the hour my mother did bear me."

They were fifteen valiant men, Black, but very bonny, And they all lost their lives for one, The Earl of Cassilis' ladie.

[160] I beg the reader to take particular notice of this circumstance. A Scotch rabble is the lowest and meanest of all rabbles, at such work as this. In their eyes, it was unpardonable that Lady Anstruther, or "Jenny Faa," should have been of Gipsy origin; but it would have horrified them, had they known the meaning of her ladyship "being of Gipsy origin," and that she doubtless "chattered Gipsy," like others of her tribe.--ED.


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