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Lays of the Scottish Cavaliers and Other Poems

Produced by Dave Morgan, Garrett Alley and PG Distributed Proofreaders

[Illustration]

LAYS OF THE SCOTTISH CAVALIERS

BY

W.E. AYTOUN.

TO

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE

ARCHIBALD WILLIAM HAMILTON-MONTGOMERIE,

Earl of Eglinton and Winton,

THE PATRIOTIC AND NOBLE REPRESENTATIVE OF

AN ANCIENT SCOTTISH RACE,

THIS VOLUME IS RESPECTFULLY INSCRIBED

BY

_THE AUTHOR._

_This Volume is a verbatim reprint of the first edition_ (1849).

CONTENTS

LAYS OF THE SCOTTISH CAVALIERS EDINBURGH AFTER FLODDEN THE EXECUTION OF MONTROSE THE HEART OF THE BRUCE THE BURIAL MARCH OF DUNDEE THE WIDOW OF GLENCOE THE ISLAND OF THE SCOTS CHARLES EDWARD AT VERSAILLES THE OLD SCOTTISH CAVALIER

MISCELLANEOUS POEMS BLIND OLD MILTON HERMOTIMUS OENONE THE BURIED FLOWER THE OLD CAMP DANUBE AND THE EUXINE THE SCHEIK OF SINAI EPITAPH OF CONSTANTINE KANARIS THE REFUSAL OF CHARON

LAYS OF THE SCOTTISH CAVALIERS

EDINBURGH AFTER FLODDEN

The great battle of Flodden was fought upon the 9th of September, 1513. The defeat of the Scottish army, mainly owing to the fantastic ideas of chivalry entertained by James IV., and his refusal to avail himself of the natural advantages of his position, was by far the most disastrous of any recounted in the history of the northern wars. The whole strength of the kingdom, both Lowland and Highland, was assembled, and the contest was one of the sternest and most desperate upon record.

For several hours the issue seemed doubtful. On the left the Scots obtained a decided advantage; on the right wing they were broken and overthrown; and at last the whole weight of the battle was brought into the centre, where King James and the Earl of Surrey commanded in person. The determined valour of James, imprudent as it was, had the effect of rousing to a pitch of desperation the courage of the meanest soldiers; and the ground becoming soft and slippery from blood, they pulled off their boots and shoes, and secured a firmer footing by fighting in their hose.

"It is owned," says Abercromby, "that both parties did wonders, but none on either side performed more than the King himself. He was again told that by coming to handy blows he could do no more than another man, whereas, by keeping the post due to his station, he might be worth many thousands. Yet he would not only fight in person, but also on foot; for he no sooner saw that body of the English give way which was defeated by the Earl of Huntley, but he alighted from his horse, and commanded his guard of noblemen and gentlemen to do the like and follow him. He had at first abundance of success; but at length the Lord Thomas Howard and Sir Edward Stanley, who had defeated their opposites, coming in with the Lord Dacre's horse, and surrounding the King's battalion on all sides, the Scots were so distressed that, for their last defence, they cast themselves into a ring; and being resolved to die nobly with their sovereign, who scorned to ask quarter, were altogether cut off. So say the English writers, and I am apt to believe that they are in the right."


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