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More Celtic Fairy Tales

Transcriber's Notes:

1. Passages in italics are surrounded by _underscores_; " in bold are surrounded by single =equals=; " in bold Gothic font are surrounded by double ==equals==;

2. A detailed list of typographical corrections and other transcription notes appears at the end of this e-text.

3. A translation of the celtic passage below is thought to be: "I sense the smell of a sweet lying Irishman on my home turf."

[Illustration: MORE CELTIC FAIRY TALES]

MORE CELTIC FAIRY TALES

_SAY THIS_

_Three times, with your eyes shut_

==Mothuighim boladh an Eireannaigh bhinn bhreugaigh faoi m'fhoidin duthaigh.==

_And you will see_ _What you will see_

[Illustration: .THE.GOLDEN.BIRD.FLIES.AWAY.WITH.THE.APPLE.]

MORE CELTIC FAIRY TALES

_SELECTED AND EDITED BY_ JOSEPH JACOBS LATE EDITOR OF "FOLK-LORE"

_ILLUSTRATED BY_ JOHN D. BATTEN

[Illustration]

NEW YORK: G. P. PUTNAM'S SONS LONDON: D. NUTT 1895

[_Rights of translation and reproduction reserved_]

_To THE MANY UNKNOWN LITTLE FRIENDS I HAVE MADE BY THE FORMER BOOKS OF THIS SERIES_

Preface

For the last time, for the present, I give the children of the British Isles a selection of Fairy Tales once or still existing among them. The story store of Great Britain and Ireland is, I hope, now adequately represented in the four volumes which have won me so many little friends, and of which this is the last.

My collections have dealt with the two folk-lore regions of these Isles on different scales. The "English" region, including Lowland Scotland and running up to the Highland line, is, I fancy, as fully represented in "English" and "More English Fairy Tales" as it is ever likely to be. But the Celtic district, including the whole of Ireland and the Gaelic-speaking part of Scotland, still offers a rich harvest to the collector, and will not be exhausted for many a long day. The materials already collected are far richer than those which the "English" region afford, and it has accordingly been my aim in the two volumes devoted to the Celts, rather to offer specimens of the crop than to exhaust the field.

In the present volume I have proceeded on much the same lines as those which I laid down for myself in compiling its predecessor. In making my selection I have attempted to select the tales common both to Erin and Alba. I have included, as specimen of the Irish mediaeval hero tales, one of the three sorrowful tales of Erin: "The Tale of the Children of Lir." For the "drolls" or "comic relief" of the volume, I have again drawn upon the inexhaustible Kennedy, while the great J. F. Campbell still stands out as the most prominent figure in the history of the Celtic Fairy Tale.


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