free ebooks
A Portraiture of Quakerism, Volume 2 by Clarkson

A PORTRAITURE OF QUAKERISM, VOLUME II

Taken from a View of the Education and Discipline, Social Manners, Civil and Political Economy, Religious Principles and Character, of the Society of Friends

by

THOMAS CLARKSON, M.A. Author of Several Essays on the Slave Trade

New York: Published by Samuel Stansbury, No 111, Water-Street

1806

CONTENTS OF THE SECOND VOLUME.

PECULIAR CUSTOMS.

CHAPTER I.

SECT. I.--Marriage--Regulation and example of George Fox, relative to Marriage--Present regulations, and manner of the celebration of it among the Quakers.

SECT. II.--Those who marry out of the society, are disowned--Various reasons for such a measure--Objection to it--Reply.

SECT III.--But the disowned may be restored to membership--Terms of their restoration--these terms censured--Reply.

SECT IV.--More women disowned on this account than men--Probable causes of this difference of number.

CHAPTER II.

SECT I.--Funerals--Extravagance and pageantry of ancient and modern funerals--These discarded by the Quakers--Plain manner in which they inter their dead.

SECT II.--Quakers use no tomb-stones, nor monumental inscriptions --Various reasons of their disuse of these.

SECT. III.--Neither do they use mourning garments--Reasons why they thus differ from the world--These reasons farther elucidated by considerations on Court-mourning.

CHAPTER III.

Occupations--Agriculture declining among the Quakers--Causes and disadvantages of this decline.

CHAPTER IV.

SECT. I.--_Trade--Quakers view trade as a moral question--Prohibit a variety of trades and dealings on this account--various other wholesome regulations concerning it._

SECT. II.--_But though the Quakers thus prohibit many trades, they are found in some which are considered objectionable by the world--These specified and examined._

CHAPTER V.

_Settlement of differences--Abstain from duels-and also from law--Have recourse to arbitration--Their rules concerning arbitration--An account of an Arbitration Society at Newcastle upon Tyne, on Quaker-principles._

CHAPTER VI.

SECT. I.--_Poor--No beggars among the Quakers--Manner of relieving and providing for the poor._

SECT. II.--_Education of the children of the poor provided for--Observations on the number of the Quaker-poor--and on their character._

RELIGION.

INTRODUCTION.

_Invitation to a perusal of this part of the work--The necessity of humility and charity in religion on account of the limited powers of the human understanding--Object of this invitation._

CHAPTER I.

_God has given to all, besides an intellectual, a spiritual understanding--Some have had a greater portion of this spirit than others, such as Abraham, and Moses, and the prophets, and Apostles--Jesus Christ had it without limit or measure._


eBook Search
Social Sharing
Share Button
About us

freefictionbooks.org is a collection of free ebooks that can be read online. Ebooks are split into pages for easier reading and better bookmarking.

We have more than 35,000 free books in our collection and are adding new books daily.

We invite you to link to us, so as many people as possible can enjoy this wonderful free website.

© 2010-2013 freefictionbooks.org - All Rights Reserved.

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Contact Us