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A Prince of Anahuac by James A. Porter

CONTENTS

PREFACE

INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER

I XXI II XXII III XXIII IV XXIV V XXV VI XXVI VII XXVII VIII XXVIII IX XXIX X XXX XI XXXI XII XXXII XIII XXXIII XIV XXXIV XV XXXV XVI XXXVI XVII XXXVII XVIII XXXVIII XIX XXXIX XX XL

PREFACE.

In placing this volume before the public we would ask the critical reader to regard with leniency its imperfections, in view of the fact that an exigency, arising through serious misfortune to the writer, made the issue a necessity.

The narrative is based upon the Tezcucan historian, Ixtlilxochitl's, brief account of the overthrow of his ancestral government by Tezozomoc, the Tepanec king, in 1418; and its restoration, under Prince Nezahualcoyotl, eight or ten years later.

The wonderful experience of Nezahualcoyotl--Hungry Fox--(abbreviated, for convenience, to 'Hualcoyotl) is made the nucleus around which the story is woven. So far as possible, the incidents related of him, his condemnation to death by Maxtla, the son and successor of Tezozomoc, his remarkable escapes therefrom, and other personal trials, have been given in accordance with the historian's account. The descriptive portions, including what relates to the country and manners of the people, are based upon conclusions drawn from reading a traditional history, and, therefore, to some extent, hypothetical; yet are, no doubt, quite as correct as a great deal of what has been written and put out as authentic.

The narrative is a representation of the writer's conception as to how the triumph of Tezcuco over her oppressors might have been brought about, together with such incidental situations and characterization as appear best suited to make it attractive. Whether or not success has been attained in the work, the public must decide.

The characters introduced, with the exception of Hualcoyotl and Maxtla, which are historical, are fictitious, created to meet the exigencies of the situations.

The pronunciation of names will be greatly simplified by the reader bearing in mind that x and ch are convertible, the sound of sh being substituted, as in Ix, which is pronounced Ish; Teochma--Te-osh-ma; Xochitl--Zosh-itl, and Ixtlilchoatl--Ish-thlil-sho-atl. S being an unused letter, z is frequently given a soft sound, as in tzin, which is pronounced tsin; Euetzin--U-et-sin; Oza--Os-a; Itzalmo--I-tsal-mo, and Itlza--I-tel-sa. H is silent, as in Hualcoyotl, which is pronounced U-al-co-yotl; Hualla--U-al-la, and maquahuitl--ma-ka-u-itl.


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