free ebooks

Pagan Origin of Partialist Doctrines by Pitrat

Dioscorus and others put together


By

the orders of the bishop of Rome, Sylvester, and of the emperor Constantine I., an oecumenical council, composed of 381 bishops, was held at Nice, in 325, to frame a symbol of faith, and to condemn Arius.

In 381, a second general council, composed of 150 bishops, was held at Constantinople, to condemn Macedonius, who denied the divinity of the Holy Spirit; and to alter the symbol of Nice, (striking inconsistency of the Romish Church which holds as an article of faith that a general council is infallible in its decisions.)

In 431, the bishop of Rome, Celestine I., assembled a general council at Ephesus, to obtain the condemnation of Nestorius, who denied that Mary was, strictly speaking, the mother of God.

In 451, a general council was held at Chalcedony, Asia Minor, for the condemnation of Eutyches, and of Dioscorus, bishop of Alexandria, who held the doctrine that there was in Jesus Christ but one nature.

From the beginning of the second century, the time when Origen taught the above two doctrines, up to the year 553, several thousand synods and principal councils were held.

Thereupon we say: The doctrine of Metempsychosis, or transmigration of the souls; and the doctrine that the punishment of the wicked in a future life will not be endless, were as important as the most of the doctrines discussed in those

councils; and Origen had a weightier influence upon the Christian communities by his talents, learning, virtue, and fame, and by the diffusion of his works, than Arius, Macedonius, Nestorius, Eutiches, Dioscorus and others put together. Therefore, if the dogma of endless hell had been generally believed by the Christians of the first, of the second, of the third, of the fourth, and of the fifth centuries, the doctrine of Metempsychosis, and the doctrine that the punishment of the wicked in a future life will not be endless, held and taught by Origen, would have been called up, discussed, and condemned in the above councils. But they were called up, discussed, and condemned, _only_ in the fifth general council, held at Constantinople, in 553. Therefore, it is an irrefutable fact that the Christians of the first, of the second, of the third, of the fourth, and of the fifth centuries, did not generally believe the dogma of endless hell.

Gregory of Neocesaree, was a disciple of Origen, and was promoted to the episcopal see of Neocesaree, in 240. He wrote the following works: Thanks to Origen, Profession of Faith on the Dogma of Trinity, Canonical Epistle, and Paraphrase of the Book of Ecclesiastes. In these works the spirit of the doctrines of Origen is seen at every page; and the dogma of endless hell is neither taught, nor declared to have been the belief of the first Christians, nor of the Christians of the third century. St. Cyprian, made bishop of Carthage in 248, is silent about the dogma of endless hell.

We pass to the Fathers of the fourth century.


eBook Search
Social Sharing
Share Button
About us

freefictionbooks.org is a collection of free ebooks that can be read online. Ebooks are split into pages for easier reading and better bookmarking.

We have more than 35,000 free books in our collection and are adding new books daily.

We invite you to link to us, so as many people as possible can enjoy this wonderful free website.

© 2010-2013 freefictionbooks.org - All Rights Reserved.

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Contact Us