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Pagan Origin of Partialist Doctrines by Pitrat

In the expiatory abode of their hell


The

Pagans believed that the deepest darkness reigned in their hell; so the Church of Rome believes that the deepest darkness reigns in the hell of the Christians.

The Pagans believed that, in their hell, the Phlegeton river rolled huge stones on fire, burning the wicked without consuming them; so the Church of Rome believed, and still believes, [even now it is an article of faith which must be believed under the penalty of excommunication, of being a heretic, and thereby of infallibly going to hell,] that, in the hell of the Christians, the wicked are plunged into a corporeal, or material, fire of sulphur, and of brimstone. St. Augustine, in his work De Civitate Dei, Liber 21, Capitulum 10, writes: "_Gehenna illa, quod etiam stagnum ignis et sulphuris dictum est, corporeus ignis erit._" [Translation.--"That Gehenna, which is said to be a marsh of fire and of sulphur, will be a corporeal fire."]

The Pagans believed that, in their hell, the wicked were tortured in their bodies and in their souls, although their bodies were in the grave; so the Church of Rome believed, and still believes that, in the hell of the Christians, the wicked are tortured in their bodies and in their souls, although their bodies are in the grave.

The Pagans believed that, in their hell, hideous furies were armed with whips and other instruments of torture; so the Church of Rome believed, and still believes,

that, in the hell of the Christians, the devils are hideous and armed with whips, tridents, harpoons, and other instruments of torture. We invite the reader to go to Catholic stores of images, and to see the representation of devils with tails, horns, and armed with instruments of torture.

The Pagans believed that, in their hell, the wicked were whipped and tortured in various cruel manners by the furies, though their bodies were in the grave; so the Church of Rome believed, and still believes, that, in the hell of the Christians, the wicked are whipped and tortured in various cruel manners by the devils, though their bodies are in the grave. The Pagans believed that, in their hell, the wicked dragged heavy chains; so the Church of Rome believed, and still believes, that, in the hell of the Christians, the wicked drag heavy chains. The Pagans believed that, in their hell, there were two principal abodes, the one expiatory, in which the common wicked were detained and tortured, until they had expiated their faults, and been purified enough to be admitted in the Elysium; and the other, the vastest, the darkest, and the deepest cavern, where great criminals were burnt and excruciated endlessly, and without any hope of cessation or relief in their torments; so the Church of Rome believed, and still believes, that in the hell of the Christians, there are two principal abodes, the one, Purgatory, where the common wicked, namely, those guilty of venial sins, are tortured and burnt in a material fire, until they have expiated their faults, and been purified enough to be permitted to crave St. Peter to open to them the gate of Paradise, and the other the vastest, the darkest, and the deepest profundity, where the heretics, the schismatics, those who eat meat on Friday, do not pay the tithe to the priests, or who disobey kindred laws of the Church, are plunged, bodies and souls, (though their bodies are in the grave,) into a devouring fire, and where they are excruciated endlessly, without any hope of cessation or relief in their torments.

The Pagans believed that, in the expiatory abode of their hell, there were many different degrees of tortures; so the Church of Rome believed, and still believes, that, in the Purgatory of the hell of the Christians, there are many different degrees of tortures. The Pagans believed that supplications could relieve and free from their tortures, the common wicked detained in the expiatory abode of their hell; so the Church of Rome believed, and still believes, that, in the Purgatory of the hell of the Christians, the common wicked, namely, those guilty of venial sins, can be relieved in their torments, and be freed from them by supplications; hence the incalculable sums of money paid to the priests, to say masses for the deliverance of those wicked; hence the countless splendid churches, the vast number of monasteries, convents, nunneries, abbeys, and other costly edifices, founded in behalf of those wicked.


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