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Pagan Origin of Partialist Doctrines by Pitrat

Believed in by the Partialist Christian Churches


"When

a man died he was brought to judgment. The public accuser was heard. If he proved that the conduct of the dead had been wicked, his memory was stigmatized, and he was deprived of the honor of funerals. The people admired the power of the laws, which extended even beyond death; and everybody, influenced by the example of others, was afraid to dishonor his family, and his own memory. If the dead was not convicted of any crime, he was honorably buried. What was the most astonishing in this judgment of the dead was that royalty itself was not spared. The kings were not judged during their life, the public good demanded it; but they were not exempted from the after death's judgment, and several of them were deprived of honorable funerals. This custom passed among the Israelites. We read in the Old Testament that wicked kings were not buried in the tombs of their fathers. Thus kings learned, that, if their majesty places them above the judgments of men, it is so no longer when death has placed them on the same level with their fellow-men.

"When the judgment, which had been pronounced, was favorable to the dead, they proceeded to the ceremony of the burial. A panegyric was delivered in which nothing was said of his birth, because every Egyptian was considered to be a noble man. His personal virtues only were praised. Then the whole assembly supplicated the gods to welcome him in the assembly of the virtuous dead, and to associate him to their eternal

bliss."

This judgment gave birth to the fable of a judgment rendered by the gods, immediately after the separation of the soul from the body. Charon was represented carrying the souls of the dead on board his bark, across the Styx river, to be judged by the great judge, Minos. This became a general belief among the Pagans, not only in Egypt, but in Greece, in Italy, and in nearly all the Oriental countries; as proved by the unanimous consent of the mythological authors. This belief has been perpetuated among the Pagans of those countries. Even in our days, the Indians believe in this judgment, and call the great judge, Zomo, or according to others, Jamen. The Japanese, followers of Buda, also believe in this judgment; and they call the great judge, Zomo. Likewise the Lamas believe in this judgment, and call the great judge Erlik-kan.

Therefore the Pagans believed in a first judgment, by a god, immediately after the separation of the soul from the body.

2d. It can be proved that the particulars of this first judgment, believed in by the Partialist Christian Churches, present a striking similarity with the particulars of the first judgment, believed in by the Pagans:

The Pagans believed that their great judge, Minos, sat on a throne, to judge the souls immediately after their separation from the bodies that they animated; so the Partialist Christian Churches believe that Jesus Christ sits on a throne, to judge the souls, immediately after their separation from the bodies that they animated. The Pagans believed that, near to Minos' throne, and at his right hand, good geniuses, or spirits, stood; so the Partialist Christian Churches believe that, near to Jesus Christ's throne, and at his right hand, good angels stand. The Pagans believed that, near to Minos' throne, and at his left hand, furies stood; so the Partialist Christian Churches believe that, near to Jesus Christ's throne, and at his left hand, devils stand.


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