free ebooks
Quotes and Images From The Tales and Novels of Jea

Produced by David Widger

QUOTES AND IMAGES FROM THE NOVELS OF FONTAINE

THE TALES AND NOVELS

OF

J. DE LA FONTAINE

A pretty wife? Beware the monks as you would guard your life

Above all law is might

Avoid attorneys, if you comfort crave

Delays are dangerous, in love or war

Ev'ry grave's the same

Extremes in ev'ry thing will soonest tire

In childhood FEAR 's the lesson first we know!

In country villages each step is seen

In the midst of society, he was absent from it

Monks are knaves in Virtue's mask

No folly greater than to heighten pain

Some ostentation ever is with grief

The god of love and wisdom ne'er agree

Those who weep most the soonest gain relief

Tis past our pow'r to live on love or air

Twere wrong with hope our fond desires to feed

We scarcely good can find without alloy

Who knows too much, oft shows a want of sense

LIFE OF

JEAN DE LA FONTAINE

Jean de La Fontaine was born on the 8th of July, 1621, at Chateau-Thierry, and his family held a respectable position there.

His education was neglected, but he had received that genius which makes amends for all. While still young the tedium of society led him into retirement, from which a taste for independence afterwards withdrew him.

He had reached the age of twenty-two, when a few sounds from the lyre of Malherbe, heard by accident, awoke in him the muse which slept.

He soon became acquainted with the best models: Phoedrus, Virgil, Horace and Terence amongst the Latins; Plutarch, Homer and Plato, amongst the Greeks; Rabelais, Marot and d'Urfe, amongst the French; Tasso, Ariosto and Boccaccio, amongst the Italians.

He married, in compliance with the wishes of his family, a beautiful, witty and chaste woman, who drove him to despair.

He was sought after and cherished by all distinguished men of letters. But it was two Ladies who kept him from experiencing the pangs of poverty.

La Fontaine, if there remain anything of thee, and if it be permitted to thee for a moment to soar above all time; see the names of La Sabliere and of Hervard pass with thine to the ages to come!

The life of La Fontaine was, so to speak, only one of continual distraction. In the midst of society, he was absent from it. Regarded almost as an imbecile by the crowd, this clever author, this amiable man, only permitted himself to be seen at intervals and by friends.

He had few books and few friends.

Amongst a large number of works that he has left, everyone knows his fables and his tales, and the circumstances of his life are written in a hundred places.


eBook Search
Social Sharing
Share Button
About us

freefictionbooks.org is a collection of free ebooks that can be read online. Ebooks are split into pages for easier reading and better bookmarking.

We have more than 35,000 free books in our collection and are adding new books daily.

We invite you to link to us, so as many people as possible can enjoy this wonderful free website.

© 2010-2013 freefictionbooks.org - All Rights Reserved.

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Contact Us