free ebooks
A report of Major Hart's case, of rice-frauds, nea

A REPORT OF MAJOR HART'S CASE, OF Rice-Frauds, NEAR SERINGAPATAM, _WITH NOTES_; AND AN APPENDIX, ADDRESSED TO THE PROPRIETORS OF EAST-INDIA STOCK.

BY W. H. INGLIS,

AUTHOR OF THE ONLY REPORT NOT ANONYMOUS, OF MR. SHERSON's CASE AND TRIAL AT MADRAS, ALSO FOR RICE-FRAUDS.

LONDON: PUBLISHED BY J. M. RICHARDSON, 23, CORNHILL, OPPOSITE THE ROYAL EXCHANGE; AND J. HATCHARD, PICCADILLY.

1818.

MARCHANT, Printer, Ingram-Court, London.

A REPORT, _&c. &c._

Were any apology necessary for this Report, a sufficient one would be where Major Hart says, "When I add that Major-general Macaulay was my junior officer; that, in consequence of my dismission, he succeeded to the very regiment which, at this hour, I should have otherwise commanded, and became a general officer so much sooner by my dismission; I am satisfied that the Honourable Court (of Directors) will think his conduct a _most material_ feature in the future consideration of my case."--India-House-Papers, p. 362.

Another instance of Major Hart's sinister attack is, where Major-general Macaulay has replied to it, saying, "There remains a farther slanderous insinuation of Major Hart's, that I think myself bound to notice. He has charged upon me, as a leading motive in the censure of his conduct, a settled design of placing myself in the command of the fortress of Palamcottah, and of the forces in the field in Tinnevelly, to his exclusion! This strange charge he more than once gave distinct hints of to myself. But he made it directly in the course of his last visit to me, in June 1815, when he behaved so coarsely. It will, I have little doubt, seem somewhat strange, even to your Lordship, (Harris, the commander-in-chief,) but so it is, that to this hour I do not know to whom I owe that command. _I not only never made application directly or indirectly for it, but the idea of applying for it never once entered my mind._--Papers, p. 388.

But Major-general Macaulay scarce needed this reply, since it is Major Hart himself who can affirm his own error. The Major says, "I shall not however pretend to defend the act _acknowledged_ of my having carried to the field a quantity of private grain.[A] No, my Lord, (Harris,) most deeply and sensibly do I feel and deplore the _error_ of my conduct.--Papers, p. 352.


eBook Search
Social Sharing
Share Button
About us

freefictionbooks.org is a collection of free ebooks that can be read online. Ebooks are split into pages for easier reading and better bookmarking.

We have more than 35,000 free books in our collection and are adding new books daily.

We invite you to link to us, so as many people as possible can enjoy this wonderful free website.

© 2010-2013 freefictionbooks.org - All Rights Reserved.

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Contact Us